BP Gulf Contamination: Sealife Deformities Alarm Scientists

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Dahr Jamail
avril 21, 2012
02:29

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BP Gulf Contamination: Sealife Deformities Alarm Scientists
par grtv

It's almost two years since BP's oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Now, scientists say they have found deformities among seafood and a great decline in the numbers of marine life. Dahr Jamail reports from New Orleans.

When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded two years ago it killed 11 people and released millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Then, in an attempt to break up the oil, BP poured nearly two million gallons of dispersant in after it.

After the deadly explosion at BP's Macondo well, 4.9 million barrels of light sweet crude flowed into the Gulf of Mexico and onto the US coastline.

The rich ecosystems of Louisiana's marshlands have been damaged and are struggling to recover. And just one or two contaminated species can affect the entire food chain.

Scott Eustis, a coastal wetlands specialist, says: "We have some evidence of deformed shrimp, which is another developmental impact. So that shrimp's grandmother was exposed to oil while the mother was developing. But it's the grandchild of the shrimp that was exposed [that] grows up with no eyes."

However, in a statement to Al Jazeera, BP says: "Every seafood sample from reopened waters has undergone rigorous testing for oil and dispersants - and every sample from reopened waters has passed those tests."

For the Gulf Coast's many fishermen the spill has had a dramatic effect. Half of all the oysters sold in the US used to come from Louisiana's waters but the region's fishermen now supply just one fifth.

Brad Robin, an oyster fisherman who has been facing economic ruin since the spill, says: "The truth of the matter is it's not there to catch, we can't catch it. It's terrible. You know disaster is an understatement for what they have done. They destroyed my industry, they destroyed my livelihood, they destroyed my business ...."

According to Dahr Jamail, "After the Exxon Valdez oil disaster in Alaska in 1989, it took four years for the full impacts of the spill to be known but in the Gulf of Mexico two years on, the impacts are already clear."

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